Working to end the stigma and discrimination of mental illness.

Stories

Celestina’s Story

Through all of my major ups and downs, my mother has been my hero, simple. She learned all she could. Aware of my signs and symptoms. No matter if my world was dusted with brilliant sparkles or covered in sewage, I could only hear her guiding voice. Sometimes it was to the hospital to help me climb out of the Swamps of Sadness.

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Marla’s Story

I’m open about my diagnosis because I like to educate people on mental illness, and to prove that the vast majority of people with psychiatric disorders are pretty much like everyone else. After all, we have dreams, we work hard, we try to play by the rules, and we love our children the best way we can. We want the best for our families and friends, and we try very, very hard to fit in so that they don’t suffer embarrassment on our behalf.

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Leah’s Story

I often cry myself to sleep. I know to most I just sound like a dumb whining teenager or something but the truth is that I am so, so scared. Scared of the future or the next year or month or minute or second and I am afraid I'm going crazy. I wake up. Look in the mirror. And I see me. I see it, every ounce of it.

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Anonymous’ Story

There was a sense of relief and sheer panic that followed my diagnosis of bipolar type II. I have been struggling with it for the past 15 years and was told that I had depression, anxiety, PTSD, etc.. I constantly felt like I was waging a war upon myself and at any moment, I could lose the war.

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Natalie’s Story

1013 is not my house number. 2045 is mine. Yet, 1013 became mine on paper Friday, March 7, 2014. In case you aren’t aware of Psych codes, 1013 is the code for an involuntary admission to a mental facility. Yes, I earned that badge, I added that to my resume, I added that title to the list of my endorsements. I’m not ashamed of 1013.

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Carly’s Story

At a very young age, I was diagnosed with severe OCD and an anxiety disorder. My childhood was hard. Everything I touched meant germs, meant anxiety. My disorder ruined countless events for my siblings, for my parents. Hours and hours in the school guidance office, in therapy and in a psychiatrists office. I was taking several medicines at the age of 7.

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Lori’s Story

Some think because mental illness affects the way one thinks, feels and behaves, that we can just stop it or get over it. In church I have heard that taking medication is not the answer, it just means reading my Bible or praying more, but would they say that to someone with diabetes? For some reason the stigma is harder now than at the beginning.

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Sarah’s Story

Dear Child, I want your admiration. The real me was vibrant, happy, enthusiastic, intelligent, articulate, loving, unselfish, responsible, compassionate and accomplished. It's as though the real me is inside of this bubble of a body pounding on it and wanting to escape it's shackles. I can see your pain and your anger. I want to be the person you want me to be but I can't.

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Jennifer D’s Story

My name is Jennifer. I am intelligent, talented, attractive, generous compassionate and funny....and I am bi-polar. I had always hoped those good qualities would outweigh the actions, reactions and outrageous behavior that my disorder caused but could never seem to manage to accomplish it.

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Allison’s Story

I will always remember my 14th birthday. Not for the reason most teenagers do, but because it was the first time my dad told me, “I love you.” It was written in my birthday card. Growing up I always knew my father was different from other dads. He did not hug me, say “goodbye” when I left for school, or ask about my day.

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